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EMC Sponsors March 12th Talk on the Importance of Wild Bees

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EMC Sponsors March 12th Talk on the Importance of Wild Bees

Friday, March 6, 2015

The production of fruits and many vegetables is dependent on successful pollination. Honey bees are the most widely used crop pollinators, but honey bee populations have experienced steep decline in North America over the past 50 years due to a variety of causes.  One potential solution to the decline in honey bees is to understand more about the role of wild, native bees in crop pollination.

On Thursday, March 12 at 4:00 p.m., the Tompkins County Environmental Management Council will sponsor a presentation from Professor Bryan Danforth, of the Cornell University Department of Entomology, entitled “Honey Bees, Colony Collapse Disorder, and the Importance of Wild Bees in Crop Pollination.”  The session will be held at the BorgWarner Room of the Tompkins County Public Library, 101 E. Green Street, Ithaca.

Research in the presenter’s laboratory at Cornell focuses on the role of wild bees in apple pollination. It has been discovered that wild bees are important, and sometimes unappreciated, apple pollinators.  These results have the potential to radically alter the way apple pollination is achieved in NewYork State.  Rather than relying on honey bees, New York State apple producers are increasingly relying on wild, native bees for their pollination needs.  The presenter will discuss strategies that growers can use to enhance wild bee diversity and abundance.

For further information, contact Brian Eden of the Environmental Management Council at 607-272-8595.